Tea on the Terrace

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Hello All! I am so excited to share this tutorial for my Tea on the Terrace quilt pattern! I used fabric from my new High Tea Collection for Lecien Fabrics, in stores this August 2016. If you’re a store owner, it should be available for pre-order now from Lecien =)

This is a timeless and beautiful quilt that’s made up of two simple blocks. Definitely easy for a beginner!

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Below is the tutorial. I hope you enjoy it!

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Quilt Measures 69.5″ x 81.5″

Materials (in parentheses are the sku#’s for the  fabrics I used from my High Tea Collection):
– 15 fat eighths or 8 fat quarters/quarter yard cuts
(assortment of all colors from High Tea Collection)
– 1 yard of Red (variety of Red Fig: 31383 Mini Fans – 31, 31379 Doile Rose – 30, 31382 Doile – 30, 31381 Mini Florals – 30)
– 3 yards for background (31382 Doile – 10 Milk)
– 1.25 yard for border (31382 Doile – 11 Brown Sugar)
– 5/8 yards binding (31381 Mini florals – 30 Red Fig)
– 4 yards for backing (31380 Strawberries – 11 Brown Sugar)

Before starting, please note: When sewing/assembling/attaching, use a 1/4″ seam allowance and assemble with right sides of the fabric facing together, then press open with an iron.  Also, WOF = width of fabric (from selvedge to selvedge). Enjoy!

Step 1 – Cutting Preparation – (layer fabrics when possible for quicker cutting)

From your background fabric (white), cut the following:
– Sixty (60) 4.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles: Along the WOF cut four 4.5″ strips. Sub-cut each strip into 4.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles.
– Thirty (30) 4 7/8″ squares: Along the WOF cut four 4 7/8″ strips. Sub-cut each strip into  4 7/8″ squares.
– Sixty (60) 4.5″  squares: Along the WOF, cut seven 4.5″ strips. Sub-cut each strip into 4.5″ squares.
– Thirty (30) 2 7/8″ squares: Along the WOF cut three 2 7/8″ strips. sub-cut each strip into 2 7/8″ squares.
– One-hundred and twenty (120) 2.5″  squares: Along the WOF, cut four 5″ strips. Sub-cut each strip into thirty 5″ squares. Quarter each square to get four 2.5″ sqaures from each.

From your red fabric, cut the following:
– Thirty (30) 2 7/8″ squares: Along the WOF cut three 2 7/8″ strips. sub-cut each strip into 2 7/8″ squares.
– One-hundred and twenty (120) 2.5″  squares: Along the WOF, cut four 5″ strips. Sub-cut each strip into thirty 5″ squares. Quarter each square to get four 2.5″ sqaures from each.

To make one churndash block (Block 2), from your quarter yard cuts choose up to 3 fabrics in the same colorway (example, three different blue fabrics). Then, cut four 4.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles from one, two 4 7/8″ sqaures from another and one 4.5″ sqaure from a third. I cut these on the go as I was assembling the blocks, so that I could choose which print combinations I wanted.

Okay…good job cutting. Now for the fun part…!

 

Step 2 – Block 1, Criss Cross Block
Make 4 half square triangles (HST): Take one white 2 7/8″ square and one red 2 7/8″ square and layer them with right sides facing together. Mark a diagonal line going from corner to corner as shown below. Sew along both sides of the diagonal line. Cut along the diagonal line orignally marked. Press open to yield two HST’s. Repeat to make a total of 4 HST’s.

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Assemble the 4 HST’s as shown below to create a windmill.

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Next, take two red 2.5″ squares and two white 2.5″ squares and assemble as shown below to create a 4-patch block. Repeat to make a total of four 4-patch blocks.

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Take one windmill, four 4-patch blocks and four 4.5″ white sqaures and assemble as shown below.

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Repeat to make a total of 15 Criss Cross Blocks for your quilt top.

Step 3 – Block 2, Churndash Block

Cutting prep for one block: From your assortment of quarter yard cuts, choose up to 3 fabrics in the same colorway (example, three different blue fabrics). Then, cut four (4) 4.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles from one, two (2) 4 7/8″ sqaures from another and one (1) 4.5″ sqaure from a third.

Make 4 half square triangles (HST): Take one white 4 7/8″ square and one color 4 7/8″ square and layer them with with right sides facing together. Mark a diagonal line going from corner to corner as shown below. Sew along both sides of the diagonal line. Cut along the diagonal line orignally marked. Press open to yield two HST’s. Repeat to make a total of 4 HST’s.

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Next, take one white 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle and one color 2.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle. With right sides facing together, sew along the length. Press open to yield one 4.5″ square. Repeat to make a total of four.

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Assemble as shown below.

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Repeat to make a total of 15 churndash blocks for your quilt top.

 

Step 4 – Assemble the Quilt top
Take all 15 of your criss cross and 15 churndash blocks and arrange them in a 5×6 formation as shown below. Start by assmebling each block within each row together, then assemble each row. together.

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Borders: Cut eight (8) 5″ strips along the WOF. Sew two strips together at their ends to create one long strip. Attach to the left side of the quilt, then trim off excess. Repeat but on the right side, followed by the top and bottom borders.

Backing: Cut your 4 yards in half to yield two  72″ x 44″ pieces. Trim off the selvedges, then sew along the length (72″ side) to create one big backing piece.

Binding: Cut eight 2.5″ strips from the WOF for your binding.

I was lucky enough to have my dear friend Monica from It’s Just Sewing finish my quilt with these perfect little Quilting in the Rain umbrellas! So in love!

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And that’s all there is to it! Two simple blocks for a beautiful and timeless quilt. I hope you enjoy my tutorial. Thanks so much for stopping by!

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Above photo taken at the University of Washington. Thanks to my husband for holding up my quilts time and time again in public places. ;-p

-jera

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The Daintiest Aprons you Ever Did See!

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Taking a moment this morning before the munchkins wake up to share some gorgeous aprons that Lecien Fabrics made using my new High Tea Collection. It is such an honor to see people making beautiful projects with my fabrics!

I found this adorable Apron Pattern on Pinterest, designed by Cotton and Curls. It’s called The Easy Ruffles Apron Tutorial. I love the vintage look of this apron, and I especially love the little bow and ruffles! Thank you Cotton and Curls for the lovely, free pattern!

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High Tea is such a delicate collection, just like fine china which is where i drew my inspiration from! I love how that is reflected in my fabrics.

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This apron was made by Lecien using Butter Cream yellow and Dusty Pink colorways.

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Below is another apron made using the Brown Sugar colorway.

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I just love those ruffles!

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Again, you can find this lovely Apron tutorial by Cotton and Curls.

Thanks for stopping by and have a wonderful Easter weekend ahead!

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High Tea Crochet Quilt

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When quilting meets crocheting, beautiful things happen. I am so excited to be sharing these photos with you.

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My very talented and dear friend, Tiffany Behmer of www.FannyLuWho.blogpsot.com, made this quilt for me to display at my booth at Spring Quilt Market. I am so thankful to have such talented friends that are helping me for quilt market preparations!

The fabrics used in this quilt are from my upcoming High Tea Collection for Lecien Fabrics, available for shops to order this Spring 2016 and in shops this Summer! The lacey-crochet details compliments my fabrics perfectly.

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I love how timeless this quilt is. And the neat thing about this one is it’s a form of Quilt As-You-Go, where the joining method is crochet.

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This might be one of the prettiest quilts I ever did see. I can’t stop admiring this one.

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Had to share all these photos. It’s such a stunner. And thank you again, Tiffany, for the beautiful crochet quilt!

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How’s that for a dose of inspiration and beauty!?

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Also, a quick thank you all for your kind comments on my last post: Simple Cathedral Windows Tutorial. You all are so kind, and make the time spent on the tutorial all worth it – thank you so much!

Have a wonderful week!

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Simple Cathedral Windows Tutorial

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This is a simple Cathedral Windows quilt tutorial that uses circles and is also Quilt As-You-Go! I really enjoyed making this quilt – it’s refreshing to make something different from your traditional patchwork quilt for a change. It comes together fast and beautifully! Simply prepare your circles and then sew them together, and no binding needed!

Please scroll down to see my tutorial, which is comprised of 7 steps: steps 1 through 6 are video tutorials, and the last step are photos.

This is my first time doing a video tutorial on my own, so forgive me if I drifted out of the frame for a few seconds here and there ;-p

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The fabrics in this quilt are from my new High Tea Collection for Lecien Fabrics, available for shops to order this Spring and in stores this Summer, August 2016!

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Inspired by my love of vintage china and tea cups, my High Tea fabrics are a delicate, soft and romantic collection.

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My High Tea collection has a total of 36 prints, so I decided to make this a 6×6 quilt (6 rows with 6 circles in each row). This size makes a great wall-hanging or baby quilt that measures approximately 37″x37″.

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Here is how the back looks. I love the quilted petal pattern on the back that is easy to achieve by simply stitching the circle edges down on the front of the quilt. This is explained in the last step of my tutorial.

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Materials for a 6×6 Quilt (measures approximately 37″x37″:

  • Batting (use needle-punched batting by Warm Company): cut thirty-six (36) 10 inch batting squares
  • 36 Fat Quarters (or Fat Eights) – Cut two 9″ circles from each (refer to my video in step 1)
  • Coordinating thread, rotary cutter
  • 9″ circle template (I used a paper plate)

Recommended, but optional:

  • rotating cutting mat (refer to my video in step 1)
  • Plastic gridded template by EZ Quilting (refer to my video in step 3)

Okay, let’s get started!  I hope you enjoy my first ever video tutorial! :-)

 

Step 1 – Cutting: cut thirty-six (36) 9″ batting circles, and seventy-two (72) 9″ fabric circles. Layer for quicker cutting.  To quickly complete the cutting, I used a 9″ paper plate as a cutting template, a rotating cutting mat by Fiskars, and a 60mm rotary cutter. Watch my video to see how I did it!

Step 2 – Sew the Circles: Next, sew thirty-six (36) padded circles, or “pancakes” as I like to call them =) Make sure to cut a hole in the front!

Beautiful stack of “pancakes”! =)

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Step 3 – Make a Square Template: Sew all 36 of your circles (or pancakes) as shown in step 2, above. Then, prepare a 6″ square template for marking your circles. My video shows how to account for any seam allowance discrepancies, so be sure to watch.

Step 4 – Properly Mark your Circles: First, arrange all 36 circles on the floor in a 6×6 formation (6 rows with 6 circles in each row). Make sure the holes (where you turned the circles right-side-out) are facing up. Then, watch my video below on how to properly mark the circles using the square template.

To recap, here are Three things to remember from my video (above) when using the square template to mark your circles:

  1. Mark the side of the circle that has the hole.
  2. Only mark the sides where you will be sewing and folding the edges. Or in other words, do not mark on the outer edges of your quilt where binding would be if this were a traditional quilt. If this sounds confusing, please watch the video for a better explanation.
  3. Hide the holes! When marking, keep in mind where the hole is to make sure it eventually gets hidden.

 

Step 5 – Sew each circle within each row together: Watch my video on how to pin and sew your circles within each row together.

 

Step 6 – Sew the Rows Together: Watch my video on how to assemble the rows. Make sure the intersections are sewn down.

Clarification: in my video above I said to make sure to “sew through all 4 layers at each intersection,” and then drifted out of the frame when trying to show it up-close, lol.” This was (obviously) my first go at a video tutorial! ;-p What I meant to say is to make sure to sew through both layers of the row at each intersection. Please see my photo below for clarification. Sorry for any confusion!

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Step 7 – Top Stitch the Petals down: Iron the petals down so they are laying flat, then top stitch them down. I don’t have a video for this, but below are some up-close photos of how it looks after I stitched them down. I simply guided my walking foot along the edge of the petals to stitch them down, using a 3.5 stitch length. Depending on your sewing machine, you may want to use a walking foot for this part. Start and end your stitch with a back-stitch.

I started with a corner circle and stitched all the petals within that circle down, then made my way to the next circle. In most cases, I was able to do continuous quilting from one circle to the next without having to end a stitch and lift my presser foot. However, whenever I came to a point where I couldn’t continuously quilt into the next circle, I simply ended that stitch with 2 back-stitches, lifted my presser foot, then re-positioned the quilt so I could continue stitching down the petals within each circle.

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Here’s how the back will look:

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I hope you enjoyed my first video tutorial, and my first quilt that I made using my own fabrics! =) If you make this, don’t forget to tag me on instagram! Seeing your projects makes the time spent doing this tutorial all worth it!

 

Happy Quilting!

 

xo jera

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High Tea Quilt Progress

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After my fabric announcement and the hustle and bustle leading up to it, it hadn’t really sunk in that I have my own fabric collection until I finally got some one-on-one, quiet quilting time with my fabrics. It felt pretty amazing!

When designing this collection, it was challenging having to choose which prints we would move forward with and which didn’t make the final cut.  I felt like I was abandoning some of my favorite prints. But after spending time actually using the fabrics and making quilt blocks out of them, I am extremely happy with the variety of solids, small and large prints as well as the final color selection for the High Tea collection!

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Having been inspired by vintage china dishes and tea cups, I would describe my High Tea fabrics to be a very delicate collection. They are softer colors, but the butter cream (yellow) and brown sugar (taupe) adds warmth to the collection, and the red gives it that extra pop of color that brings out all the strawberries and florals.

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For my first quilt using High Tea, I wanted to go with a classic block to go with the vintage theme. I chose a churn dash block, and I absolutely love the result! I will eventually be providing a free pattern for this quilt, so be on the lookout! =)

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Red is my favorite color, so this collection had to have red!

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I am patiently waiting for more of my sample fabrics to ship to me so that I can finish this quilt. As soon as I get those, I’ll post another update on my progress.

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I gotta say that it sure feels nice to be quilting again! Everything leading up to this didn’t leave much room for sewing. =)

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I hope you enjoyed seeing my progress. =) Looking forward to sharing more on this one!

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Thanks for stopping in and reading me- have a wonderful weekend ahead!

 

xo Jera

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