Strip Tease quilt top – Quick ‘n Easy

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The RainAs I mentioned before, I am a fabric junky and I often find myself hoarding fabrics. I made this quilt top using a beautiful pack of pre-cut 10″ squares (aka layer cakes) that I had been hoarding and admiring for almost a year. I was finally able to “let go” and use these fabrics for a gorgeous quilt.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The RainThis is a really simple quilt to make, especially for anyone who is a beginner quilter or wants a quick project. The finished size measures 47″x45.5″. It makes a great lap quilt.

Materials for quilt top:

  • Quilt border – 1 yard
  • Corner pieces – 1/4 yard (or one fat quarter)
  • Main quilt top – Twenty 10″ squares. There are several options for this:
You can buy 10″ pre-cut squares, aka layer cakes. These packs come with forty pre-cut squares, so save the other half for another tutorial I will be posting that will use the remaining 20 squares.

OR
You can buy 10 fat quarters (cut two 10″ squares per fat quarter).

For this quilt I used a layer cake pack which came with about 10 different prints. If you don’t want this many prints (i.e. if you just want a blue and white quilt), you can buy fabric by the yard. You can cut twelve 10″ squares per one yard of fabric.

Okay, let’s get started 🙂

Divide your stack of twenty 10″ squares into four stacks of five squares each. In each stack, layer the squares so they’re perfectly aligned. Using a quilting ruler and rotary cutter, make four uneven cuts from each stack (simply tilt the ruler so it’s not square with the edge). The photos below are an example of cuts made from one stack.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

When cutting, be sure that the narrow part of the strip measures ≥ 1.5″ since you will be sewing 1/4 inch seams on both sides of the strip later. Now that you’ve made your cuts, you will have five stacks of fabric strips; each containing five layers.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Select one fabric strip from each of the five stacks to form a square as shown in the picture above. Be sure to arrange the strips in the same consecutive order of the five stacks (i.e. the first strip should should be from stack #1, the second strip should be from stack #2, etc.). Now that you have the fabric laid out, you can start sewing!

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

With the right sides of strip #1 and #2 facing each other, align the corners, pin the fabric so it stays in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. You can do a back stitch (~1/4”) on each end to secure the stitch. After sewing the ¼” seam, press the fabric open using an iron. Repeat with strip #3: with right sides of strip #2 and #3 facing each other, align the corner, pin the fabric so it stays in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. Press open.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Repeat this process with the remaining strips until you have all 5 strips sewn together to form a 10”x8” block. Assemble a total of 20 finished blocks.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Once you have all 20 blocks finished, lay them out in five rows of four blocks each as shown above. In each row, sew all four blocks together using a ¼” seam, and press open. After you’ve sewn the blocks together in each row, sew the rows together. Follow the same process as was used to sew the fabric strips together (with the right sides of row #1 and #2 facing each other, align the corners, pin the fabric so it stays in place, sew a ¼” seam, and then press open).

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain
Tip: Slow the machine down while sewing across seams – especially when the seams are going in opposite directions as shown above. When sewing too quickly over a seam, the needle may catch the seam, folding it over and creating a bump.

After you’ve sewn all 20 blocks together, all that’s left is sewing on the borders! Use the diagram below for cutting the border fabric. [Click the image to make bigger].

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain
Start with sewing the left and right borders (A) using the same method as above: with right sides facing together, align the fabric and pin along the length to keep it in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. Press open. Lastly, sew on the top and bottom borders (C) after you’ve sewn the corner pieces (B) on each end.

In my next tutorials I will show you how to finish the quilt (i.e. how to baste, quilt and bind your top).

Let me know if you have any questions and I’ll try to get back to you promptly. 🙂 If anyone makes this quilt, please send me a picture (if you let me, I’d love to post it)! It’s so interesting seeing a single pattern done but with personalized color schemes.

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Quilting 101 – the Basics

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The RainMaking a quilt is a 3 step process: (1) Sewing the quilt top, (2) basting and quilting the top and (3) binding the quilt. Step 1 is sewing the actual patchwork of the quilt top. Step 2 is when you sandwich the quilt in three layers: the quilt top, batting and the backing. You need to baste these three layers together before doing the actual quilting. The 3rd and final step is binding the quilt. There several ways to do each of these steps in which I will attempt to go over in later tutorials. I will continue to update this post with links to tutorials as I make them (i.e. how to bind a quilt).

Below are some basics/terminology to start with:

1/4 inch seam allowance
For the accuracy of your quilt pattern, it is important to be consistent with a 1/4 inch seam allowance for all quilting projects. A lot of sewing machines come with a seam guidance plate below the presser foot, as shown in the picture below.

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

A helpful tip that I still use is after I find the perfect 1/4 inch from the needle, I put painters tape along the 1/4 inch line as a guide for my fabric (as shown above). It helps create a consistent 1/4 inch seam, and all you have to do is guide the edge of your fabric along the tape.

Quilting Tools
Basic tools you will need (other than your sewing machine):

  • Rotary cutter. I use a 45 mm by Olfa and love it.
  • Rotary mat. I started with a 12″x18″ cutting mat. I suggest eventually investing in the 36″x24″ mat or else you will hate cutting bigger pieces such as border or binding strips.
  • 1.5″ pins and large safety pins. You will need the pins when piecing together your quilt top. The safety pins may come in handy later when basting your quilt top, batting and backing together.
  • Quilting ruler(s). You don’t have to get these all at once, but if you bought the following rulers you’d probably be set: 8″ square, 10″ square and 6″x24″. The 6×24 is great for cutting border pieces and binding strips; I probably use this ruler the most.
  • Iron for pressing the seams.
  • Scissors for cutting thread. I like to use applique scissors because they’re really sharp.
    Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

    (Pictures above: Rotary cutter, pins, applique scissors, rotary mat and quilting rulers)

Cutting your Fabrics

Before rotary cutters and quilting rulers came about, quilters would trace the pieces they need onto the fabric and then cut each piece out with scissors. Thank heaven for rotary cutters and quilting rulers – they’re quick and accurate! If you haven’t used one before, it takes several cuts to get the hang of it.

When cutting, do not use the rotary cutter like a pizza cutter where you roll it back and forth. That will create a messy cut and if you roll it back you will nick your blade on the ruler. Place the fabric and ruler in a position where you can make a single, forward cut away from you.

Once you have more practice, you can layer your fabrics to make more cuts. If you have a project where you need multiples of a single shape cut out (i.e. twenty 5″ squares), there are quick cutting tricks, such as layering your fabrics and cutting 5″x20″ rectangles, and from the rectangle cutting 5″ squares).

Below is a quick, 3-step tutorial on how to cut a 4″ square using a rotary cutter and ruler:

    1. To cut a square, you first need to cut a perfect 90 degree angle. In the picture above, I’ve positioned the ruler on the fabric to cut ~5″ square

      Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

 

    1. Keep the ruler in place with one hand, and with your other hand use the rotary cutter to make a single, outward cut away from you. In the picture below, you almost have a perfect square. The top portion that you cut has a perfect 90 degree angle; now you just need to trim the bottom portion.

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

      Tip: When you make the cut, apply a little pressure to the cutter to ensure you cut through the fabric. If you find yourself at an awkward cutting position, move the mat or move to a different position around your cutting mat so that you’ll be in a comfortable position to make outward cuts.

 

    1. Now that a perfect 90 degree angle has been cut (from step 2), rotate the square to trim the opposite corner. Line the freshly cut 90 degree angle against the inside lines of the ruler as shown below. In this case, we’re cutting a 4″ square, so position the freshly cut angle on the 4″ lines. Make your outward cuts to trim the excess fabric.

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

      And now you have a perfect 4″ square! The above is the basics in using your rotary cutter, it takes a little practice but before you know it, you’ll get the hang of it.

Fabric Cuts

When I first started quilting, I had no idea what the measurements were for one yard of fabric from a fabric bolt, or the difference between a fat quarter vs. a quarter yard cut. This will help you get an idea of what cuts you may need for different projects.

One yard of fabric typically measures 36″x44″.

Fat quarter vs. quarter yard cut – A fat quarter is 1/4 yard cut of fabric that measures 18″x22″; usually you can get more cuts out of this measurement instead of the typical 9″x44″ quarter yard cut. Some quilt shops/fabric boutiques sell fat quarter packs, as shown in the picture below. It’s a great way to get an assortment of matching fabrics for piecing quilt tops.

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain
Pre-cut fabrics – In select shops (mostly fabric boutiques) you can buy pre-cut squares, triangles and strips. These are great because they come packaged with an assortment of fabrics (usually up to 10 different prints) that are all in the same color scheme. Below are packs of 5″ squares, aka charm packs. 10″ pre-cut squares are aka layer cakes. Squares are great because with a single cut, you can make them into rectangles or triangles, allowing you to create an array of shapes/quilt blocks.

Quilting 101 - the Basics - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

That’s all I have for Quilting 101 for now. I’m happy to answer any questions you may have or suggestions on 101 tutorials, so please let me know. 🙂 And like I mentioned earlier, I will continue to update this post with more quilting basics and tutorials as they come.

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Welcome! So who am I?

Hello to anyone who sees this! I started this blog because I love to sew and quilt. And I’m a total fabric junky and fabric hoard(er) and proud of it! When I set sight on a gorgeous print, it inspires me to be creative (and i drool a little).

In this blog I plan to post easy-to-follow tutorials on different sewing projects and quilting projects. And no worries if you’ve never quilted or sewn before, hopefully my tutorials will get you interested, maybe even inspired to start. They’ll be simple to follow, anyone-with-opposable thumbs-can-do-it crafts. 🙂 And since I love fabric so much, i hope to eventually offer beautiful, affordable fabrics to you (but that’s still in the works ;).

Why Quilting in the Rain? Because i’m located in the rainy city of Seattle. My crafts corner is situated in front of a window and I often find myself quilting in the rain. Though, I recently dropped two grand on my new Pfaff sewing machine and quilting frame – if i keep that up I’ll literally be quilting in the rain.

Anyway, enough with my rambling. Below is my sweet baby…

She’s a Pfaff Grand Quilter…i haven’t named her yet.
And this is my crafts corner where the magic happens:

And of course, my Imperial Quilting frame. The frame can double in length. To quilt, I simply pop my grand quilter onto the frame and quilt away:
My hubby helped me put the frame together. Scratch that. My hubby put the frame together while I fumbled with the manual.
Prior to buying it I was optimistic that the frame wouldn’t impede on his musical/guitar area…that was an epic fail…
My hubby is the best. 🙂

Well, that was my little intro. I’ve been working on 2 new quilts and plan on posting tutorials soon. My hubby and I also finished revamping an old, puke-yellow armoire. We painted it and upholstered the doors and basically made it into an ultimate storage unit for all my quilting tools and fabrics. I’ll post before and after photos. 🙂 Until next time..!

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