Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards

Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Don’t throw away your leftover fabric scraps! Instead, save them to make these unique patchwork fabric cards. By using baby shower or Christmas or Halloween, etc.-themed fabrics, you can easily customize these cards for a one-of-a-kind holiday or special occasion greeting card.

Materials:

  • Fabric scraps
  • Plain cardstock (you can get this at your local crafts or paper store)
  • Coordinating thread (I used white colored thread in the bobbin to match my cardstock)

Instructions:

  1. Start by cutting your fabric scraps into random size strips. Make sure the strips are at least ½ an inch longer than the front of your cardstock. You will trim the extra fabric later (in step 4).
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
  2. Starting from the right end of the cardstock, place one strip of fabric on top of the front of the card. Take a second strip of fabric and place it to the left of the first strip, overlapping the first strip by at least ¼ inch (shown in figure 1). Next, sew along the edge of the second strip making sure to stitch through both layers of fabric (shown in figure 2). When you sew, start and end your stitch with a backstitch.
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 1
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 2

  3. Continue the process above using the rest of your strips until the front of the card is covered (shown in figure 3). Be creative and place the strips however you like – you can make the strips extra wide or perfectly straight; you can even use a zig-zag stitch or your favorite embroidery stitch if you wish. For this example, I used a simple straight-stitch. Figure 4 (below) is how the stitching on the back of the card will look after the front is covered.
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 3
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 4

  4. Turn your card face down, and trim off the excess fabric around the card (shown in figure 5). I used a ruler and rotary cutter for a clean cut. Lastly, sew a ¼ inch seam around the border of the card to stitch the fabric in place (shown in figure 6). Start and end your stitch with a backstitch.
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 5
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain
    Figure 6

  5. And that’s all there is to it! Now you have a beautiful, one of-a-kind patchwork card! =) The 2nd picture below is how the back of the card top will look. I think it looks really cool and emphasizes that it really is patchwork, while showing off your awesome sewing skillz (yes, with a “z”, because you’re that kewl). But if it bothers you or if you wanted that extra space to write in, simply glue in a sheet of card stock or paper cut to size and cover. Enjoy!
    Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain Patchwork Fabric Greeting Cards - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Oh and one minor note – set aside a sewing needle for your patchwork cards only as paper will dull your needle.

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In the Beginning Fabrics – $5/yd

I warned you that I’m a fabriholic. That being said, I took the liberty to purchase 10 bolts of fabric! I’m tweakin’ over here! 8-)* Why did I buy 10 bolts? Because I want to offer you a beautiful variety of good quality fabrics for a great deal. I’m addicted to fabrics and an avid quilter, so I know how expensive good quality fabrics can get. It’s a modest variety, but nonetheless, it’s a great deal. And by great deal I mean $5 yard, so stay tuned! I’ll make a post when they’re available (I’m currently working on a quilt top that showcases these fabrics). I plan to put the fabrics together in kits that come with a jera-made pattern. 🙂

Aren’t they beautiful? These fabrics are designed by In the Beginning Fabrics, a textile company based in Seattle. They’re gorgeous prints. A mix of two collections: Haru Kaze (Spring Breeze) and Shiki.

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Finn’s baby blankie

This is a short and sweet (just like Finn!) post to show off Finn Flanigan rockin’ his baby blanket. 🙂 Finn was born December 4 of last year and is the son of proud parents Lidia and Sean, two really great friends of mine. Below is a picture of the front and back of a post card that Lidia and Sean used for Finn’s birth announcement. Sean took the photo used for this post card – I don’t even have to say this but I will anyway, Sean is an astounding and well renown photographer, his blog speaks for itself.
Finn's baby blankie - Quilting In The RainThe gal that designed the stitching print on the postcard was inspired by the quilting on the blanket. Below is another photo of Finn that Lidia sent me from her iPhone.

Finn's baby blankie - Quilting In The RainWhen I went shopping for fabric to make a quilt for sweet little Finn, I bought your typical nursery, pastel-colored prints with bunnies flying air planes, yada yada yada. Don’t get me wrong, they were cute fabrics! But it just wasn’t “Finn” – what can I say, Finn’s just too awesome for that. As soon as I saw the sock monkey fabric print, I knew it was the perfect find 🙂 I bought it right away, and the bunnies-flying-airplanes fabric is still in my cabinet..collecting dust.

A tid bit on the quilt: I used the sock monkey collection by Moda and did a star and moon applique on a couple of the blocks, simply by ironing on sticky interface and then stitching along the edge. It’s a great way to applique, not only because it’s quick but after a few washes, you’ll get a nice fray around the edges. You can’t see the back of the quilt in this picture, but it was put together using leftover fabric scraps.

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Converted Crafts Wardrobe

I’ve been a busy bee working on a quilting tutorial I hope to post soon. In the meantime, I thought I’d post this revamped wardrobe project that my husband and I worked on a month ago.

When we moved to our house there was a yellow-tinted wardrobe in our loft that the previous owners had left. For the longest time we used it to store junk and other misc. crap that we wanted out of site. After making a Goodwill run, we decided to convert it to a funky storage unit where I can store all my fabrics and quilting supplies.

Below is a BEFORE and AFTER picture. 🙂

Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain

How we did it:
1. I started by finding a fabric print that really caught my eye and that would inspire my creativity. The print I chose is by Alexander Henry, I bought it from one of my favorite local quilt shops (the Quilting Loft) in Ballard. I only needed 2 yards to cover the doors.

2. I measured the doors and cut the fabric, adding an inch to each dimension to allow enough fabric to fold and nail to the inside of the door. I folded the extra inch of fabric in half around each dimension, pressing it with an iron to hold the fold in place. Then my husband used a brad-gun to upholster the fabric to the door.

3. Prior to hanging the upholstered doors, we painted the cabinet. I went to Lowes with a swatch of my chosen fabric to find a good match; the smallest can of paint was just enough to apply 2 coats.

4. My husband installed shelves inside the wardrobe for my fabrics and peg board on the inside of each door for hanging all of my quilting rulers and thread, as shown in the photos below.

Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain

It was a simple and fun project that we did together. 🙂 And now when I open my crafts wardrobe I can easily see all of my supplies. Before I had fabrics stashed away in boxes that I had forgotten about, and my quilting rulers were starting to bend from being stored improperly.

Shown in the 1st picture below, my husband cut the shelves in a triangular shape for storing the ironing board . It’s nice having a place to hide it!

Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain Converted Crafts Wardrobe - Quilting In The Rain

Check out the knobs on this baby! 😉 I ordered them from Home Depot; I never thought I’d be so excited to receive knobs in the mail. It was the finishing touch to this project AND unfortunately the most expensive piece 😐

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Strip Tease quilt top – Quick ‘n Easy

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The RainAs I mentioned before, I am a fabric junky and I often find myself hoarding fabrics. I made this quilt top using a beautiful pack of pre-cut 10″ squares (aka layer cakes) that I had been hoarding and admiring for almost a year. I was finally able to “let go” and use these fabrics for a gorgeous quilt.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The RainThis is a really simple quilt to make, especially for anyone who is a beginner quilter or wants a quick project. The finished size measures 47″x45.5″. It makes a great lap quilt.

Materials for quilt top:

  • Quilt border – 1 yard
  • Corner pieces – 1/4 yard (or one fat quarter)
  • Main quilt top – Twenty 10″ squares. There are several options for this:
You can buy 10″ pre-cut squares, aka layer cakes. These packs come with forty pre-cut squares, so save the other half for another tutorial I will be posting that will use the remaining 20 squares.

OR
You can buy 10 fat quarters (cut two 10″ squares per fat quarter).

For this quilt I used a layer cake pack which came with about 10 different prints. If you don’t want this many prints (i.e. if you just want a blue and white quilt), you can buy fabric by the yard. You can cut twelve 10″ squares per one yard of fabric.

Okay, let’s get started 🙂

Divide your stack of twenty 10″ squares into four stacks of five squares each. In each stack, layer the squares so they’re perfectly aligned. Using a quilting ruler and rotary cutter, make four uneven cuts from each stack (simply tilt the ruler so it’s not square with the edge). The photos below are an example of cuts made from one stack.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

When cutting, be sure that the narrow part of the strip measures ≥ 1.5″ since you will be sewing 1/4 inch seams on both sides of the strip later. Now that you’ve made your cuts, you will have five stacks of fabric strips; each containing five layers.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Select one fabric strip from each of the five stacks to form a square as shown in the picture above. Be sure to arrange the strips in the same consecutive order of the five stacks (i.e. the first strip should should be from stack #1, the second strip should be from stack #2, etc.). Now that you have the fabric laid out, you can start sewing!

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

With the right sides of strip #1 and #2 facing each other, align the corners, pin the fabric so it stays in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. You can do a back stitch (~1/4”) on each end to secure the stitch. After sewing the ¼” seam, press the fabric open using an iron. Repeat with strip #3: with right sides of strip #2 and #3 facing each other, align the corner, pin the fabric so it stays in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. Press open.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Repeat this process with the remaining strips until you have all 5 strips sewn together to form a 10”x8” block. Assemble a total of 20 finished blocks.

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain

Once you have all 20 blocks finished, lay them out in five rows of four blocks each as shown above. In each row, sew all four blocks together using a ¼” seam, and press open. After you’ve sewn the blocks together in each row, sew the rows together. Follow the same process as was used to sew the fabric strips together (with the right sides of row #1 and #2 facing each other, align the corners, pin the fabric so it stays in place, sew a ¼” seam, and then press open).

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain
Tip: Slow the machine down while sewing across seams – especially when the seams are going in opposite directions as shown above. When sewing too quickly over a seam, the needle may catch the seam, folding it over and creating a bump.

After you’ve sewn all 20 blocks together, all that’s left is sewing on the borders! Use the diagram below for cutting the border fabric. [Click the image to make bigger].

Strip Tease quilt top - Quick 'n Easy - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting In The Rain
Start with sewing the left and right borders (A) using the same method as above: with right sides facing together, align the fabric and pin along the length to keep it in place, and then sew a ¼” seam. Press open. Lastly, sew on the top and bottom borders (C) after you’ve sewn the corner pieces (B) on each end.

In my next tutorials I will show you how to finish the quilt (i.e. how to baste, quilt and bind your top).

Let me know if you have any questions and I’ll try to get back to you promptly. 🙂 If anyone makes this quilt, please send me a picture (if you let me, I’d love to post it)! It’s so interesting seeing a single pattern done but with personalized color schemes.

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